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World > South America > Ecuador > Relations with U.S. (Notes)

Ecuador - Relations with U.S. (Notes)


U.S.-ECUADORIAN RELATIONS
The United States and Ecuador have maintained close ties based on mutual interests in maintaining democratic institutions; combating narcotrafficking; building trade, investment, and financial ties; cooperating in fostering Ecuadors economic development; and participating in inter-American organizations. Ties are further strengthened by the presence of an estimated two million Ecuadorians living in the United States and by 150,000 U.S. citizens visiting Ecuador annually, and by approximately 20,000 U.S. citizens residing in Ecuador. More than 100 U.S. companies are doing business in Ecuador.

The United States assists Ecuadors economic development directly through the Agency for International Development (USAID) and through multilateral organizations such as the Inter-American Development Bank and the World Bank. In addition, the U.S. Peace Corps operates a sizable program in Ecuador. Total U.S. assistance to Ecuador amounted to over $29 million in FY 2006.

The United States is Ecuadors principal trading partner. In 2006, Ecuador exported about $6.7 billion in products to the U.S. For over 10 years Ecuador has benefited from duty-free entry for certain of its exports under the Andean Trade Preferences Act (ATPA) and received additional trade benefits under the Andean Trade Promotion and Drug Eradication Act (ATPDEA) in 2002. The U.S. Congress approved a six-month extension of those benefits, now set to expire on June 30, 2007. In May 2004 Ecuador entered into negotiations for an Andean free trade agreement with the U.S., Colombia, and Peru, but negotiations between the U.S. and Ecuador have not resumed after the Government of Ecuador announced controversial reforms to hydrocarbons legislation in April 2006.

Both nations are signatories of the Rio Treaty of 1947, the Western Hemispheres regional mutual security treaty. Although there are problems with money laundering, border controls, and illegal alien immigration, Ecuador shares U.S. concerns over narcotrafficking and international terrorism and has energetically condemned terrorist actions, whether directed against government officials or private citizens. The government has maintained Ecuador virtually free of coca production since the mid-1980s and is working to combat money laundering and the transshipment of drugs and chemicals essential to the processing of cocaine. It has recently given greater priority to combating child labor and trafficking in persons.

Ecuador and the U.S. agreed in 1999 to a 10-year arrangement whereby U.S. military surveillance aircraft could use the airbase at Manta, Ecuador as a Forward Operating Location to detect drug trafficking flights through the region.

Ecuador claims a 320-kilometer-wide (200-mi.) territorial sea. The United States, in contrast, claims a 12-mile boundary and jurisdiction for the management of coastal fisheries up to 320 kilometers (200 mi.) from its coast but excludes highly migratory species. Although successive Ecuadorian governments have declared a willingness to explore possible solutions to this issue, the U.S and Ecuador have yet to resolve fundamental differences concerning the recognition of territorial waters.

Principal U.S. Embassy Officials
Ambassador--Linda Jewell
Deputy Chief of Mission--Jefferson Brown
Political Counselor--Erik Hall
Economic Counselor--David Edwards
Consul General--Elizabeth Jordan
Commercial Attaché--James F. Sullivan
Management Counselor--Michael St. Clair
Public Affairs Officer--Michael Greenwald
Regional Security Officer--Martin J. Rath
USAID Director--Alexandra Panehal
Narcotics Affairs Section Director--John Haynes

Guayaquil Consulate
Consul General--Douglas Griffiths
Chief, Consular Section--Jill Johnson

U.S. Embassy
Avenida Patria 120
Quito, Ecuador
(tel. (593)(2) 256-2890/256-1634)
The mailing address is APO AA 34039

U.S. Consulate
9 de Octubre and Garcia Moreno
Guayaquil, Ecuador
(tel. (593)(4) 232-3570)

Consular Agent for the Galapagos
Puerto Ayora
(tel. (593) (5) 526-330 or (593) (5) 526-296)

Other Contact Information
U.S. Department of State
2201 C Street, NW
Washington, DC 20520
Main Switchboard: (202)-647-4000 (http://www.state.gov)

U.S. Department of Commerce, Trade Information Center, International Trade Administration
1401 Constitution Avenue
Washington, DC 20230
(tel: 800-USA-TRADE, Internet: http://trade.gov)

Ecuadorian-American Chamber of Commerce--Quito
Edificio Multicentro, 4 Piso
La Nina y Avenida 6 de Diciembre
Quito, Ecuador
Tel: (593) (2) 250-7450
Fax: (593) (2) 250-4571
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: www.ecamcham.com (Spanish)
www.ecamcham.com/default_en.htm (English)
(Branches: Ambato, Cuenca & Manta)

Ecuadorian-American Chamber of Commerce--Guayaquil
Av. Francisco de Orellanda y Alberto Borges
Edificio Centrum, Piso 6, Oficina 5
Tel: 593-(4)-269-3470 or 593-4-269-3471
Fax: 593-(4)-269-3465
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.amchamecuador.org (Spanish)
(Branch: Manchala)


Facts at a Glance: Geography - People - Government - Economy - Communications - Transportation - Military - Climate - Current Time - Ranking Positions - US Dollar Exchange Rates
Notes and Commentary: People - Economy - Government and Political Conditions - Historical Highlights - Foreign Relations - Relations with U.S.



Facts at a Glance
Geography
People
Government
Economy
Communications
Transportation
Military
Climate
Current Time
Ranking Positions
US Dollar Exchange Rates


Notes and Commentary
People
Economy
Government and Political Conditions
Historical Highlights
Foreign Relations
Relations with U.S.





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