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World > Africa > Morocco > Government and Political Conditions (Notes)

Morocco - Government and Political Conditions (Notes)


GOVERNMENT AND POLITICAL CONDITIONS
Morocco is divided into 16 administrative regions (further broken into provinces and prefectures); the regions are administered by Walis (governors) appointed by the King.

The Moroccan Constitution provides for a monarchy with a Parliament and an independent judiciary. Ultimate authority rests with the King. He presides over the Council of Ministers; appoints the prime minister following legislative elections; appoints all members of the government taking into account the prime minister's recommendations; and may, at his discretion, terminate the tenure of any minister, dissolve the Parliament, call for new elections, or rule by decree. The King is the head of the military and the country's religious leader.

Since the constitutional reform of 1996, the bicameral legislature consists of a lower chamber called the Chamber of Representatives, which is directly elected, and an upper chamber, the Chamber of Counselors, whose members are indirectly elected through various regional, local, and professional councils. The councils' members themselves are elected directly. Parliament's powers, though limited, were expanded under the 1992 and 1996 constitutional revisions to include budgetary matters, approval authority, and establishing commissions of inquiry to investigate the government's actions. The lower chamber of Parliament may dissolve the government through a vote of no confidence.

The last parliamentary elections were held in November 2002 and were considered largely free, fair, and transparent. At that time, King Mohammed VI formed a government appointing then Interior Minister Driss Jettou as Prime Minister. Cabinet level positions were drawn from most major parties in the coalition.

Following the 2002 elections, King Mohammed VI highlighted several goals toward which the new government should work: gainful employment, economic development, meaningful education, and increased housing availability. To meet the King?s objectives, the Jettou government embarked on a series of initiatives and reforms, which he laid out in his early days as Prime Minister.



Jettou emphasized that first and foremost, modernization and revitalization of the country?s infrastructure (roads, trains, communications, water, etc.) and national economy (support for Moroccan businesses, preparations for competition, modernization of modes of production, etc.), were necessary towards development progress in Morocco.



In order to create employment opportunities, the government is promoting investment in the tourism, industrial, fishing, and service industries, and is ameliorating, restructuring, and modernizing the education system.

Preparations are currently underway for the next parliamentary elections in September 2007.

Principal Government Officials
Head of State--King Mohammed VI
Prime Minister--Driss Jettou
Minister of Foreign Affairs and Cooperation--Mohammed Benaissa
Ambassador to the United States--Aziz Mekouar
Ambassador to the United Nations--El Mostafa Sahel

Morocco maintains an embassy in the United States at 1601 - 21st Street NW, Washington, DC 20009 (tel. 202-462-7979).


Facts at a Glance: Geography - People - Government - Economy - Communications - Transportation - Military - Climate - Current Time - Ranking Positions - Moroccan Dirham Exchange Rates
Notes and Commentary: People - Economy - Government and Political Conditions - Historical Highlights - Foreign Relations - Relations with U.S.



Facts at a Glance
Geography
People
Government
Economy
Communications
Transportation
Military
Climate
Current Time
Ranking Positions
Moroccan Dirham Exchange Rates


Notes and Commentary
People
Economy
Government and Political Conditions
Historical Highlights
Foreign Relations
Relations with U.S.





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