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World > South America > Colombia > Relations with U.S. (Notes)

Colombia - Relations with U.S. (Notes)


U.S.-COLOMBIAN RELATIONS
In 1822, the United States became one of the first countries to recognize the new republic and to establish a resident diplomatic mission. Today, about 25,000 U.S. citizens are registered with the U.S. Embassy as living in Colombia, most of them dual nationals.

Currently, there are about 250 American businesses conducting operations in Colombia. In 1995-96, the United States and Colombia signed important agreements on environmental protection and civil aviation. The two countries have signed agreements on asset sharing and chemical control. In 1997, the United States and Colombia signed an important maritime ship-boarding agreement to allow for search of suspected drug-running vessels.

During the Pastrana administration, relations with the United States improved significantly. The United States responded to the Colombian Governments request for international support for Plan Colombia by providing substantial assistance designed to increase Colombias counter-narcotics capabilities and support human rights, humanitarian assistance, alternative development and economic and judicial reforms.

The U.S. has continued close cooperation with Colombia under the Uribe administration. Recognizing that terrorism and the illicit narcotics trade in Colombia are inextricably linked, the U.S. Congress granted new expanded statutory authorities in 2002 making U.S. assistance to Colombia more flexible in order to better support President Uribes unified campaign against narcotics and terrorism.

The results thus far have been impressive, but much remains to be done. U.S. policy toward Colombia supports the Colombian Governments efforts to strengthen its democratic institutions, promote respect for human rights and the rule of law, intensify counter-narcotics efforts, foster socioeconomic development, address immediate humanitarian needs and end the threats to democracy posed by narcotics trafficking and terrorism. Promoting security, stability and prosperity in Colombia will continue as long-term American interests in the region.

Principal U.S. Embassy Officials
Ambassador--William Braucher Wood
Deputy Chief of Mission--Milton K. Drucker
Political Counselor-- John S. Creamer
Economic Counselor--Lawrence J. Gumbiner
Consul General--Raymond G. McGrath
Commercial Counselor--Larry Farris
Management Counselor--Kathleen Hodai
Military Group Commander--COL Kevin D. Saderup
Narcotics Affairs Section Director--Julie Gianelloni Connor
Defense Attache--COL Rey A. Velez
Public Affairs Officer--Mark Wentworth (scheduled to arrive in March 2007)
Regional Security Office--Robert Hartung
USAID Director--Liliana Ayalde

U.S. Embassy
Calle 22D Bis, No. 47-51
Bogota, Colombia
(tel: (571) 315-0811; fax: (571) 315-2197).
The mailing address is APO AA 34038.

U.S. Consular Agency in Baranquilla
Calle 77, No. 68-15
Baranquilla, Colombia
(tel: (575) 353-0970 or 0974; fax: (575) 353-5216).

Other Contact Information
U.S. Department of State
2201 C Street, NW
Washington, DC 20520
Main Switchboard: 202-647-4000 (http://www.state.gov)

U.S. Department of Commerce, Trade Information Center, International Trade Administration
1401 Constitution Avenue
Washington, DC 20230
(tel: 800-USA-TRADE, Internet: http://trade.gov)

Colombian-American Chamber of Commerce
Calle 98, @2264, Oficina 1209
Apartado Aereo 8008
Bogota, Colombia
(tel: (571) 621-5042/7925/6838, fax: (571) 612-6838, email: 73050.3127@compuserve.com) Chapters in Cali, Cartagena, Medellin.


Facts at a Glance: Geography - People - Government - Economy - Communications - Transportation - Military - Climate - Current Time - Ranking Positions - Colombian Peso Exchange Rates
Notes and Commentary: People - Economy - Historical Highlights - Foreign Relations - Relations with U.S.



Facts at a Glance
Geography
People
Government
Economy
Communications
Transportation
Military
Climate
Current Time
Ranking Positions
Colombian Peso Exchange Rates


Notes and Commentary
People
Economy
Historical Highlights
Foreign Relations
Relations with U.S.





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